• Cryptome, the Web Site You Don’t Know About But Need to Know About

    October 28, 2012 // 3 Comments »

    Actually, if you already know about Cryptome, sorry, this blog post isn’t for you. Move along, pal, nothing new.

    But if you’re interested in national security issues, and particularly if you prefer to study primary source documentation and make up your own mind about things, take a look at Cryptome. The site is w-a-y old school, just a page of links in good old HTML 101. They’ve been online since 1996 and serve as a repository of documents and information, some leaked, some obtained via FOIA. Cryptome was Wikileaks decades before Wikileaks.


    For example, Cryptome currently offers aerial views of the CIA’s basic training facility (swanky), Camp Peary in Virginia, with its shooting ranges, driving track and own airstrip.

    Following the incident in Benghazi? Cryptome has overhead images of the compound and surrounding neighborhood.

    Readers are intended to be critical consumers, as Cryptome offers no commentary or validation. A list of allegded CIA agents and front companies, for example, seems overly broad, but you be the judge.


    The web site also focuses on the NSA, cryptography and publishes interesting albeit open source U.S. government documents aplenty. For anyone with such documents to share, Cryptome is happy to receive them, and includes irs PGP key on the site.



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    Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved. The views expressed here are solely those of the author(s) in their private capacity.

    Posted in Democracy, Embassy/State, Other Ideas

    Hillary Clinton Internet Freedom Hypocrisy

    December 9, 2011 // 4 Comments »

    The people at Cryptome have a few words for Madame Secretary:

    Clinton’s comments contradict how the WikiLeaks-Bradley Manning Cablegate affair is being handled by the USG. And her accusations of government and commercial abuse and spying on the Internet apply to the US and its allies. The conference session should face these contradictions and if not resolve them establish principles and an agenda to do so. A demonstration of genuine Internet freedom would be the release of Bradley Manning and termination of the USG prosecutorial Cablegate investigation.


    And never mind this.

    But wait, there’s more. Glenn Greenwald at Salon also noticed the hypocrisy of our fave Secretary of State:

    Hypocrisy from the U.S. Government — having U.S. officials self-righteously impose standards on other countries which they routinely violate — is so common and continuous that the vast majority of examples do not even merit notice. But sometimes, it is so egregious and shameless — and sufficiently consequential — that it should not go unobserved. Such is the case with the speech delivered by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton yesterday at a Conference on Internet Freedom held at the Hague, a conference devoted to making “a stand for freedom of expression on the internet, especially on behalf of cyber dissidents and bloggers.” Clinton has been flamboyantly parading around for awhile now as the planet’s leading protector of Internet freedom; yesterday she condemned multiple countries for assaulting this freedom and along the way actually managed to keep a straight face.


    For me, the Secretary’s best line was this:

    The United States wants the internet to remain a space where economic, political, and social exchanges flourish. To do that, we need to protect people who exercise their rights online.


    That exercise of rights, Madame Secretary, includes the First Amendment, exercised here, by one of your employees. Thank you for believing so strongly in this and supporting my right to continue to speak.




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    Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved. The views expressed here are solely those of the author(s) in their private capacity.

    Posted in Democracy, Embassy/State, Other Ideas

    US Punishes “We Meant Well”

    October 19, 2011 // Comments Off on US Punishes “We Meant Well”

    Before there was Wikileaks, there was Cryptome, online since 1996 publishing government documents from around the world. Stubbornly clinging to a web design that looked old-fashioned in 1996, Cryptome especially features documents about the CIA. It also posts declassified historical documents, and is a great resource for researchers and historians.

    Cryptome proudly asserts:

    Cryptome welcomes documents for publication that are prohibited by governments worldwide, in particular material on freedom of expression, privacy, cryptology, dual-use technologies, national security, intelligence, and secret governance — open, secret and classified documents — but not limited to those. Documents are removed from this site only by order served directly by a US court having jurisdiction. No court order has ever been served; any order served will be published here — or elsewhere if gagged by order. Bluffs will be published if comical but otherwise ignored.



    The site has also published a copy of my denouement from the State Department’s Bureau of Diplomatic Security. I do not know where they obtained this, as it has unredacted portions different from the redacted version I have posted on this blog.

    Now that State has suspended my security clearance, I’ll have to rely on sites like Cryptome and Wikileaks to keep up with my reading. It may be a secret– don’t tell anyone– put their search engines are also way better than anything inside the firewall at State when you need to locate something quickly.



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    Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved. The views expressed here are solely those of the author(s) in their private capacity.

    Posted in Democracy, Embassy/State, Other Ideas